First time buyer mortgage rates fall to a record low

This is why now is the time to buy for first time buyers, the banks in the UK are
making it easier for first-time buyers to get on the property ladder by offering the
lowest mortgage rates since records began in 1995. Interest rates on two and five
year deals have fallen to a twenty three year low, according to the latest Bank of
England figures.

People looking to buy a property with a 5 % deposit and take out a loan for the
remaining 95% could get a two year mortgage with an interest rate of 3.3%, down
from 4.02 % a year ago. For five-year mortgage, the average rate was 3.89% at
the end of October. It was 4.71% in the same month the previous year. Both rates
beat the record lows for each type of mortgage reached a month earlier, at 3.39%
and 3.95% respectively, suggesting that lenders are increasing efforts to push
businesses up. The reason for these rates falling is mainly down to the stiff
competition among leaders in the industry.

Low-deposit mortgages are often popular among first-time buyers, but are usually
more expensive than other property loans, meaning lenders have more scope to
cut rates. Saving up a large deposit typically results in a cheaper mortgage. The
average two-year mortgage rates for a buyer with a 10 % deposit is 2.24%.
Even with cheaper 95% mortgages and exemptions on stamp duty, first time
buyers still need to raise more than £10,000 to put down a 5% deposit on a
typical property. The current lowest rate for a two year fixed mortgage with a 5%
deposit is 2.76%, from Halifax, however this is only available through brokers,
who charge a fee. It is common to see mortgage lenders offer low rates in the
final months of every year in an attempt to hit their end of year targets. However,
it is thought that the current low rates for first-time buyers will continue into
2019.

House prices rise for the fifteenth quarter in a row

The UK’s house prices have now risen 15 quarters in a row and are now up some 36.6% since the height of the financial crisis in the spring of 2009, writes property developer Richard Carr.

Growth

Richard Carr House Price increase

Can house price increases ever be moderated?

During the second quarter of 2016 house prices in the United Kingdom increased by 1.8% on the previous three months and a massive 8.5% based on the same period a year earlier.

As a result, the typical house price of a standardised UK property rose to a record figure of £215,582 from £211,868.

Despite the country wide increase, there’s still huge disparity throughout the regions. For example, London house prices have increased more than double the UK average and nearly four times greater than in Northern Ireland.

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One in Five London Homes Worth At Least £1m

New figures suggest that one out of every five homes in the UK’s capital city of London is worth at least £1m, writes property developer Richard Carr.

Expensive housing market

Richard Carr's £1m London homes

London homes

London is the UK’s most populous and crowded city. People from around the world flock to London because it is the heart of the UK’s economy, as well as a premier global financial and technology hub. There is an increasingly strong demand for a dwindling supply of living spaces in London, meaning that its average house prices have experienced extraordinary growth in the past few years.

The latest index from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reports that the average London house price grew by 14.5% in the year to April 2016. The ONS has implemented a new formula to determine its average UK residential property values,  so the average London house price is actually lower for April (£470,000) than it was in March under the old system (£552,000). Despite this change, average London residential real estate values continue to hover around the half million mark.

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