Ministers propose changes to CIL and s106 payments

In a move which has delighted property developer Richard Carr, Ministers unveiled last week details of planning reforms and ‘financial benefits’ reporting.

Developers to benefit

Get rid of CIL says Richard Carr

Richard Carr supports the reduction of CIL

The government has proposed that council tax revenue, business rate revenue and s106 payments should all be included in the new report.

Ministers also confirm that the new requirements to set out the financial benefits of planning applications would be drawn widely and take into account a variety of factors.

The report will look at and go beyond ‘local finance considerations’ and take into Community Infrastructure Levy.

Permission in Principle (PiP)

Furthermore, the Department for Communities and Local Government has clarified key detail over its proposals for permission in principle, brownfield registers, simplification of the neighbourhood plan process, changes to statutory consultation on planning applications and the new arrangements for section 106 dispute resolutions.

Focusing on PiP, Ministers have proposed that the so-called qualifying documents that can grant PiP on allocation should be future local plans, future neighbourhood plans and brownfield registers.

The amount of time in which a development should be given a Pip should be five years, whilst Ministers have also confirmed that the only ‘in principle matters’ that should be determined as part of a PiP should be its location, the uses and the amount of development that has been planned.

Brownfield

Developing brownfield land into housing has been high on the government’s agenda for a number of years, with Ministers last year committing to ensuring that 90% of suitable brownfield sites should have planning permission for housing by 2020.

Within the consultation document the government affirmed the seriousness of its commitment by suggesting that planning authorities which failed to make “sufficient” progress against its brownfield objective would be unable to claim the existence of an up-to-date five year housing land supply.

Richard Carr hopes to see some serious relaxations with regards to the amount of tax that developers are currently expected to pay to achieve planning permissions. He is convinced that more houses would get built if the government did more to relax taxations.