London on the ‘architectural map’

In terms of architecture and construction, Richard Carr has wrote about designs in China and Saudi Arabia however the latest example is far closer to home in London, United Kingdom.

Twisting Tower

Richard Carr writes about Lombard Wharf

What Lombard Wharf will look like following construction

The London skyline is set to receive a fantastic new structure delivered by Barratt London as construction prepares to get underway on a 28-storey twisting tower.

The landmark will be located on one of the last remaining Thames riverfront sites in Wandsworth, London.

It will be in historical company with the Grade II listed Cremone Bridge sitting opposite it.

Social funding

Work is set to get underway in late August, 2015 with enabling and piling works starting after the developer gained full planning permission for the 135 apartment scheme at Lombard Wharf.

As well as offering a pleasing and creative piece of architecture to the London skyline, Barratt London has also allocated 20% of the apartments for on-site ‘affordable’ housing, whilst they have also committed £1.6m to improve local infrastructure in the Capital.

Design

Local architects Patel Taylor have included wraparound balconies, rotated at an angle of two degrees which appear as a series of ‘rotating discs’.

This optical twist is achieved by the diagonal lines of tapered solid balustrades jutting against the horizontal lines of the balconies.

Alastair Baird, regional managing director of Barratt London, said: “Lombard Wharf is one of the last remaining plots on the Thames and we are looking forward to regenerating this brownfield site, which has been vacant since 2012 and currently restricts pedestrian access along the river.”

Residents will be welcomed at ground level by a double-height glazed lobby and will have access to a riverfront retail unit. Above that the mezzanine level contains another retail unit, gym exclusively for residents and staff and management welfare facilities.

There’s also good parking facilities in the basement of the building with bays for 30 vehicles as well as 182 bicycle spaces.

Taller is better

Richard Carr loves this kind of development and believes it’s about time that London is finally embracing taller buildings, although it has been slightly enforced as there isn’t any space left!

He wishes that regional local planning authorities would consider the same.