Developers pleased with latest budget proposals

Developments Specialist Richard Carr supports the recent article in the Financial Times titled ‘Developers hail UK planning reforms’.

Planning reforms

Richard Carr property developer

Property developers pleased with new proposals

According to the paper, UK developers have failed the recent planning reforms announced in George Osborne’s emergency budget, which are designed to boost Britain’s housebuilding from near-historic lows.

Some of the main proposals centred around brownfield sites and the relaxation of planning. Small house building firms are being incentivised to build on brownfield sites as they no longer have to spend time and money obtaining planning permission.

Furthermore, a new zoning system is to be introduced on brownfield sites where developers will get automatic planning permission.

Stewart Baseley, executive chair of the Home Builders Federation told the FT.com that the cost of the planning system was one of the biggest barriers when building more homes.

“Speeding up the rate at which planning applications on previously developed land are processed and closing the gap between central government ambition and local authority performance is key,” he said.

Taller

Richard Carr is also pleased to see that the government will work with the London Mayor to push through proposals to allow homeowners to increase the height of their home without approval.

Richard believes that building taller, residential buildings is a step forward and would help ease the current demand for homes.

In a recent blog, Richard spoke about the industry’s recent revival as planning permissions reached a pre-recession high. However, ministers and policy makers don’t just have to meet the current housing shortage, but also the expected increase in demand for homes.

However, planning director at London First, Faraz Baber, warned against giving developers too much freedom: “We need to be really careful about giving carte blanche for turning industrial land into housing as some of it will be key to supporting economic growth.”