Unlock the door to a home of your own with a Help to Buy ISA

The Help to Buy scheme continues to grab the headlines, with its success rate for getting first-time buyers onto the property ladder. A recent study from the Ministry of Housing, shows that almost half a million completions have taken place since 2013, with 430,000 of these completions made by the first-time buyer market.

There was a total of 494,108 completions, which have taken place using one or more of the governments Help to Buy schemes, over 93% of which took place outside of London. The average house price purchased through the schemes, was around the £200,000 mark. First-time buyers have now opened 1.4 million Help to Buy: ISAs offering government bonuses of up to £3,000 on top of their savings.

These figures highlight how invaluable the Help to Buy scheme has become, and how it will continue to support home buyers into the next decade. It has also helped prop up the new build sector and provided housebuilders with a solid target plan for the delivery of new homes. Demand will continue to grow for new build homes even though some questions arise around the price, value and borrowing requirements and affordability. Build quality and energy efficiency standards attached to new build properties continue to be a primary focus for the property developer sector. Help to Buy has certainly created a positive pathway for the growing numbers for first time buyers, housebuilders, lenders.

So how does it actually work?

Launched on April 1st, 2013 and available until 2023, help to buy is an equity loan scheme. Under the scheme, the buyer is only required to find 5% of the property value for a deposit. The government then lends you up to 20% of the value of the property in the form of an ‘equity loan’. The remaining balance can then be topped up through a mortgage. There’s no interest to pay on the equity loan for the first 5 years, after that the interest kicks in at 1.75%.

It’s open to both first-time buyers and home movers, but it is restricted to new build homes. From April 2021 onwards only first-time buyers will be able to apply. When you come to sell your home, the government will take back its 20% share. If you don’t sell, the money is due back after 25 years. The idea with the help to Buy equity loan is that, because you’re theoretically only borrowing 75% from the mortgage lender, payments will be lower than if you had used a 95% mortgage. Help to Buy is a great route to get onto the housing ladder, or to even upsize your house if you are wanting to start now. But you must be quick, as its not going to go on forever!

The economic benefit of development to the local community

Some people call us greedy and some call us ruthless, but really developers helps communities grow which fuels economic growth. A lot of people fail to recognise how far the economic benefit stretches with the creation of new developments. Many people just assume that it is merely a percentage of housing that is allocated to the council for social housing, under the section 106 affordable housing act, but really it’s so much more than that. For many property developers it is very frustrating, as they are penalised for being greedy and bringing too much change into a community, but people do not see the bigger picture and the economic growth we create.

The house building industry is a massive driver of the UK economy and makes a huge
contribution to communities across the country. While delivering much needed new homes of all tenures, house builders are quietly creating and sustaining jobs, boosting investment in infrastructure and amenities in village, towns, and cities. As well as becoming ever more reliant on private builders to deliver affordable housing through planning agreements, vast sums are ploughed into new roads, schools and community facilities each year. Below we talk about the economic footprint provided in the UK of the property development industry.

1. Before a site has even been acquired, a company has many employees working in
house, depending how large the company is. As you can see already there are jobs
created and business rates paid even before the development takes place, this could be
anything from graduate to apprenticeship jobs helping the community grow.

2. Acquiring a development site is a key stage and the beginning of the property
development process, there are many systems in place to help to source a site, which is
normally done in house. Once this is found, each party has to have a legal
representative which they will outsource to a local law firm.

3. Development appraisal forms the backbone of the financial side of property
development and is arguable the most important step within the property development
process. A developer will know their appraisals inside and out and be able to quickly and efficiently put together an initial site appraisal and cash flow. This will be done in house, and is the deciding factor as to whether the site is worth purchasing, where many different considerations will be taken into account. This is the start of outsourcing the project to different expertise in the field. This could be a planning consultant, architect, solicitor, engineer. This changes from site to site, but there is always lots of jobs to go around in the local community.

4. A development cannot happen or go ahead without funding. Money is one of the 3
pillars of property development and is an area new and inexperienced developers struggle with the most. For each site that you look at, you need to understand how you
will fund it and how to structure the financial side. Each site is different and will require
a different set of funding criteria, and because it’s become increasingly difficult for
developers to get funding, they have to sometimes work with different funding
partners, this can lead to inefficiency and become very expensive.

5. One of the 3 pillars of property development is planning, and the required permissions to actually be able to start and finish a development project. As a property developer, we need to manage the process to ensure all the permissions are in place and that we have a scheme designed that is viable. A developer will know how to optimise and maximise every single square foot on a site to achieve the maximum amount of profit the sit can yield, which in fact means more affordable housing due to being a percentage measurement. There are many other permissions required, not just
planning. For example, building control and party walls. These all need to be managed
along the process to ensure that a development can actually go ahead and happen.

6. Reaching the construction step along the property development process is a major
milestone and there will have been some serious work, effort tune and money invested
into the project. There are many ways to contract with a builder, and this will also
depend on the role you are taking during the construction process.

7. Once the development is finished, it will then be sent off to different estate agents
around the area, but also the development company itself may choose to market the
properties. Sometimes they may hire private marketing companies around the area to
give it that extra push, or work with local newspapers and PR companies.

As you can see from the above, no matter what angle the development is going there is always a need for outsourcing jobs in certain expertise. What people do not understand is the idea of job creation for so many local businesses from development companies. It being a major boost for the local economy, providing modern and attractive spaces for businesses, creating new jobs and encouraging more visitor numbers into the town throughout the year. Below you can see some statistics put together from Litchfield’s of the economic footprint of developers around the UK.

• A total of £38 billion for the economy is generated by house building each year.

• A total of £4.2 billion is either given from developers to help provide affordable housing
in the local area.

• There are over 698,000 jobs created each year from a variety of fields of expertise.

• There is an around £2.7 billion in tax paid each year, which comes from a Council tax, Stamp Duty tax, Corporation tax, National Insurance, Pay As You Earn tax.

• A total of £5.9 billion spent in local shops and services by residents of new homes.

• A total of £1.2 billion is spent on tenants making their houses feel like home
i.e. furniture

 

 

Will the new Planning Bill speed up the delivery of new homes?

According to propertywire.com new measures in the UK’s updated Neighbourhood Planning Bill will support more house building and will give local councils more say over housing developments, writes Richard Carr.

Improvements

richard-carr-discusses-new-planning-bill

Will the new bill speed up the delivery of new housing?

New Housing and Planning Minister Gavin Barwell has promised that the new bill will speed up and strengthen the neighbourhood planning process by making it easier for plans to be revised if local circumstances change.

Barwell told propertywire.com: “We need to build more homes and this Bill is the first of a number of measures to deliver on that. We have already built more than 900,000 homes since 2010 and now this Bill will help speed up delivery of the further new homes our country needs and ensure our foot is still firmly on the pedal.

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Remembering Tower Park – Richard Carr

For regular readers of the Bournemouth Echo you will have seen their recent article reminiscing about Tower Park and its most popular attractions Ice Trax and the Venue; the latter was owned and operated by Allied Leisure PLC.

Richard Carr was the Chairman and Chief Executive of the Allied Brand formally Restaurants and then becoming Allied Leisure PLC. He had built the company from the start in 1981 before floating it on the London Stock Exchange in 1987. In 1990 he sold the Restaurant Division to Grand Metropolitan for in excess of £13 million.

Although Richard wasn’t the land owner of Tower Park, he is widely recognised as being the catalyst that made it happen. Staking his entire reputation on the venture at the time (1989), Allied Leisure took the lease for almost all of the park!

Richard Carr

Richard Carr at the Venue – www.bournemouthehco.co.uk

 

In total, Allied Leisure PLC rented over 1.5 acres of space and helped Tower Park become the ‘out of town’ leisure concept which proved to be a national success and was replicated all over the UK.

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Richard Carr in the Archives: Allied Leisure

Richard Carr is a former business owner and entrepreneur, with one of his first business ventures being with Allied Leisure.

About Allied Leisure

Richard Carr Scoops Marketing Award for Allied LeisureBorn in 1983, Richard Carr built a business of Counter Service Fast Food Restaurants predominately in London and the M3 corridor.

The business was floated on the USM in 1987 before being sold to Grand Metropolitan for £13m in 1990 and re-named Allied Leisure PLC.

Richard left the company in 1994 to pursue a career in private ownership; this was after the business had been listed on the London Stock Exchange.

Allied Leisure scoops marketing award

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Richard Carr in the Archives: Battle for Cage and Zoo

Richard Carr operated in the nightlife economy for a number of years, owning and running a variety of nightclubs and bars. He also created the hugely popular ‘Slinky’ brand, which saw huge events hosted across the globe with some of the world’s biggest DJs.

Carr wins Cage and Zoo battle

Richard Carr Battle for Cage and ZooRichard Carr made the front page headline of the 1992, March 3rd edition of the Evening Echo after the police dropped their objections to his £2million nightspot.

He won his battle to build one of the country’s biggest nightclubs in Bournemouth despite the Police’s fears that it may lead to trouble in the streets.

However, Bournemouth magistrates gave Richard Carr the go-ahead to create the 2,000 capacity club in the town centre. Although the police had dropped their objections they told the court that if trouble ensued, they would object to the club renewing its operating licence.

A £2million project

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Richard Carr in the archives: Allied Leisure on the rise

Allied Leisure was one of Richard Carr’s first business ventures and one that saw him combine fast food counter restaurants, bowling alleys and a leisure complex.

Looking back at the company’s rise under Carr, we look at an archive article regarding Allied Leisure’s profits rise.

Entertainment company announces 20% profit increase

Richard Carr Allied Leisure on the rise

Richard Carr in the Archives

Despite announcing 20% profit increases, Richard Carr explained that the rise was below expected at the time and that plans to expend the business into Germany have been shelved for the moment.

Allied Leisure, which ran a ten-pin bowling alley, nightclubs and theme pubs, including the Tower Park complex in Poole, revealed pre-tax profits of £3.1 million compared to £2.6 million the previous year, a 19% rise.

Allied Leisure adapting with the times

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