9 out of 10 new homes in Salford are being built on brownfield land

Salford, Greater Manchester, is leading the way in terms of brownfield development with a recent report from its council showing that 87.9% of new homes were built on brownfield land, writes property developer Richard Carr.

Regeneration

Richard Carr Middlewood Locks in Salford

Middlewood Locks in Salford

Richard Carr believes that councils and home builders should target brownfield land before looking at green belt land for developments. Building upon disused brownfield land can regenerate communities and bring life into areas that was suffering economically.

Salford City Council’s report covered the period between April 1 2015 and March 31 2016. The result is pleasing one for the council who have encouraged developers to use brownfield sites as far as possible.

Councillor Derek Antrobus told salfordonline.com: “Salford needs new homes and we need as many as possible to be built on brownfield sites. This not only eases pressure on green spaces but it means new homes are built closer to existing jobs, schools and shops.

“Government policy does not allow us to reject greenfield development as we could in the past. But 96% of planning permissions which have not yet been implemented are on brownfield sites.

“We want to make sure we use up brownfield land before contemplating significant release of further greenfield sites. As Salford’s population continues to grow, that will be the challenge for the next few decades.”

1,353 homes were added during the 12 month period with just 164 built on greenfield sites.

Salford

Richard Carr is pleased to see the council taking a firm grip on development to help improve their local areas and based on the statistics further brownfield development can be expected.

  • The report also shows that 2,560 properties are under construction – just 134 of which are on greenfield land , with another 180 brownfield conversions under way.
  • Over 6,600 homes are yet to be built on sites where construction has already started with a further 3,909 given full planning permission and 4,012 given outline planning permission on sites where construction has not yet started. Only 535 of these are on greenfield land.

Richard believes more councils such take such a stance and promote brownfield development to regenerate suffering areas.